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  • Originally posted by md21 View Post
    My cousin died last night of covid. She was 41 years old.
    I'm sorry to hear that Md21. My condolences to you and your family.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by samnite View Post

      Nice. I didn't even know they were modeling this as well. I like how you can see the county data graphed on the weather channel's website. Johns Hopkins doesn't show the county graphs.
      Curious if you have been involved with any treatment regimen that has proven effective.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by FuqMizzou View Post
        Shit that was the price it was when I was in college. Trump made it 1993 again.

        Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
        it would have been lower had Trump not meddled in-between Putin and MBS over oil. Trump claimed he got those guys to cut a deal to save US oil in North Dakota

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        • My son has been fighting COVID for almost 3 weeks now. He’s lost 19 pounds and all he does is sleep all day. It has completely altered all of our lives and day to days activities. What sucks even more is not being able to just hold him tight and love on him. He’s 13, so Dad hugging him isn’t the coolest thing in the world, but right now that’s all I want to do.

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          • Originally posted by daCat View Post

            Curious if you have been involved with any treatment regimen that has proven effective.
            It is all pretty much anecdotal and unclear at this point. To actually prove effectiveness you would need a control group not receiving the drugs that is of similar makeup as the experimental group receiving the drug. We aren't doing any trials at my hospital though so we just give people the drugs since we have the supply for now. We have enough supply of plaquenil and zithromax to use it on all patients under investigation for COVID (symptomatic but awaiting confirmation test results) or positive for COVID so we are using it for everyone.

            We have tried Actemra in some cases to prevent the cytokine storm that leads to ARDS/intubation. The patient I had last week that received it was stable and still on high flow oxygen so I can only guess it has helped prevent him from going into ARDS (impossible to say if he would be doing the same if he had not received the drug). We are finding that people mostly do not survive once they get to the point of needing intubation although there are a few miraculous recoveries here and there. It is not clear why or how some people survive and others don't. We have seen that keeping people in the prone position has helped with oxygenation for those on supplemental oxygen (nasal cannula) or on a vent. The prone position helps to open up more parts of the lungs and improve oxygenation.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Shamster View Post
              My son has been fighting COVID for almost 3 weeks now. He’s lost 19 pounds and all he does is sleep all day. It has completely altered all of our lives and day to days activities. What sucks even more is not being able to just hold him tight and love on him. He’s 13, so Dad hugging him isn’t the coolest thing in the world, but right now that’s all I want to do.
              Sorry to hear that Shammy. Is he at home or in a hospital? Is he needing oxygen? Do you have access to a device to test his oxygen saturation at home?

              https://www.walgreens.com/store/c/wa...089451-product

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              • Originally posted by samnite View Post

                It is all pretty much anecdotal and unclear at this point. To actually prove effectiveness you would need a control group not receiving the drugs that is of similar makeup as the experimental group receiving the drug. We aren't doing any trials at my hospital though so we just give people the drugs since we have the supply for now. We have enough supply of plaquenil and zithromax to use it on all patients under investigation for COVID (symptomatic but awaiting confirmation test results) or positive for COVID so we are using it for everyone.

                We have tried Actemra in some cases to prevent the cytokine storm that leads to ARDS/intubation. The patient I had last week that received it was stable and still on high flow oxygen so I can only guess it has helped prevent him from going into ARDS (impossible to say if he would be doing the same if he had not received the drug). We are finding that people mostly do not survive once they get to the point of needing intubation although there are a few miraculous recoveries here and there. It is not clear why or how some people survive and others don't. We have seen that keeping people in the prone position has helped with oxygenation for those on supplemental oxygen (nasal cannula) or on a vent. The prone position helps to open up more parts of the lungs and improve oxygenation.
                I take it your hospital isn't using hydroxycloroquine. Also, is there any way to introduce cytokine antagonists to mitigate the storm? Also, have you tried inversion as opposed to prone? I'm nowhere near being knowledgable in your field, so please bear with my pedestrian inquiries.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by daCat View Post

                  I take it your hospital isn't using hydroxycloroquine. Also, is there any way to introduce cytokine antagonists to mitigate the storm? Also, have you tried inversion as opposed to prone? I'm nowhere near being knowledgable in your field, so please bear with my pedestrian inquiries.
                  Plaquenil is hydroxychloroquine. We are using it.

                  Actemra inhibits Interleukin-6 which is involved in the inflammatory process (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tocilizumab). It is being used to try to mitigate the cytokine storm.

                  What do you mean by inversion? Lying supine? That would be the position that most patients/people would rest in by default.

                  Lying prone uses gravity to keep fluid out of the parts of your lungs involved in extracting oxygen from the air you breathe.

                  It would delay how soon you would need oxygen support and maybe keep you from needing to be placed on a ventilator

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by samnite View Post

                    Plaquenil is hydroxychloroquine. We are using it.

                    Actemra inhibits Interleukin-6 which is involved in the inflammatory process (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tocilizumab). It is being used to try to mitigate the cytokine storm.

                    What do you mean by inversion? Lying supine? That would be the position that most patients/people would rest in by default.

                    Lying prone uses gravity to keep fluid out of the parts of your lungs involved in extracting oxygen from the air you breathe.

                    It would delay how soon you would need oxygen support and maybe keep you from needing to be placed on a ventilator
                    I thought it was dangerous and unproven, though? Or did we already abandon that talking point?

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Shamster View Post
                      My son has been fighting COVID for almost 3 weeks now. He’s lost 19 pounds and all he does is sleep all day. It has completely altered all of our lives and day to days activities. What sucks even more is not being able to just hold him tight and love on him. He’s 13, so Dad hugging him isn’t the coolest thing in the world, but right now that’s all I want to do.
                      I’m sorry to hear that, I hope he gets well soon.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by samnite View Post

                        Plaquenil is hydroxychloroquine. We are using it.

                        Actemra inhibits Interleukin-6 which is involved in the inflammatory process (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tocilizumab). It is being used to try to mitigate the cytokine storm.

                        What do you mean by inversion? Lying supine? That would be the position that most patients/people would rest in by default.

                        Lying prone uses gravity to keep fluid out of the parts of your lungs involved in extracting oxygen from the air you breathe.

                        It would delay how soon you would need oxygen support and maybe keep you from needing to be placed on a ventilator
                        By inversion, I mean hanging upside down, like a bat. I realize it would have to be done in limited time intervals, just curious if it would be useful. It works for some back problems.

                        Thanks for explaining the uses for the drugs.

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                        • They use temperature scanners in us when we go in the office. If it’s over 100.2 you get sent home. Mine today was 94.1. The nurses didn’t bat an eye at me being hypothetmatic. Lmfao. Good to see we’re using shitty equipment.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by ivegostdacityblues View Post
                            They use temperature scanners in us when we go in the office. If it’s over 100.2 you get sent home. Mine today was 94.1. The nurses didn’t bat an eye at me being hypothetmatic. Lmfao. Good to see we’re using shitty equipment.
                            Reminds me when a buddy's kid was sent home from daycare for having a "fever" of 94.1 and was told that their thermometer doesn't go over 95.

                            - blank stare, blank stare -

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                            • Cops need to drive around and pull over people wearing gloves while driving. Unless you put on a fresh pair when you entered, the magic gloves don’t protect you.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by CheaterMichael View Post
                                Cops need to drive around and pull over people wearing gloves while driving. Unless you put on a fresh pair when you entered, the magic gloves don’t protect you.
                                They’re for style points, make you go faster.

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