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  • So this could be causing this trouble.

    Derek Thompson@DKThomp
    The US economy is biased toward higher-density areas where young liberals cluster, diminishing their electoral power.

    While the electoral system is biased toward the lowest-density areas that draw indignation from their economic decline.

    This seems bad.
    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/ar...n-gone/594133/

    Thus a theory that unifies and explains both say DPR and tOSUfanboi2 complaints.
    Last edited by TTURedRaider; 07-18-2019, 07:42 PM.

  • #2

    “The counties that make up Los Angeles, Chicago, New York City, and Philadelphia shed a combined 2 million domestic residents from 2010 to 2018. For many years, these cities’ main source of population growth hasn’t been babies or even college graduates;”

    It’s odd that they thrown Philly into that time frame as we’ve grown in the last decade after decades of decline. Party because contrary to popular belief it’s become a solid city in the past 10 years, partly because you can afford a lot more than you can in DC/New York while living a city life.

    Comment


    • #3
      That's the system as designed and has been since the founding.

      Comment


      • #4
        I like this piece. Very informative and objective.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ivegostdacityblues View Post
          “The counties that make up Los Angeles, Chicago, New York City, and Philadelphia shed a combined 2 million domestic residents from 2010 to 2018. For many years, these cities’ main source of population growth hasn’t been babies or even college graduates;”

          It’s odd that they thrown Philly into that time frame as we’ve grown in the last decade after decades of decline. Party because contrary to popular belief it’s become a solid city in the past 10 years, partly because you can afford a lot more than you can in DC/New York while living a city life.
          The growth was stemmed from folks wanting to win the Flipadelphia crown

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by TTURedRaider View Post

            https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/ar...n-gone/594133/

            Thus a theory that unifies and explains both say DPR and tOSUfanboi2 complaints.
            They’re both right, to a degree. I see both sides. Our country is at a scary place. I honestly don’t know what, if anything, can bridge the divide.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Deschet View Post

              They’re both right, to a degree. I see both sides. Our country is at a scary place. I honestly don’t know what, if anything, can bridge the divide.
              Stop calling all white people racist. Stop mocking political rivals. Knock off the N-word. Enough with identity politics. Don't assume you know what someone else is thinking. Both sides have adopted Rules for Radicals now as a political tool, that needs to go. Colleges need to bring back free speech, and stop these stupid safe spaces.

              I mean, those few things would be a beginning.

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              • #8
                Good find. It articulates a lot of issues I have been tracking and reading about for a while, and combines them into one piece. Very well written.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DynastyFSU2 View Post

                  Stop calling all white people racist. Stop mocking political rivals. Knock off the N-word. Enough with identity politics. Don't assume you know what someone else is thinking. Both sides have adopted Rules for Radicals now as a political tool, that needs to go. Colleges need to bring back free speech, and stop these stupid safe spaces.

                  I mean, those few things would be a beginning.
                  Hey, it's the sensible Dynasty post we get about 4 times per year.

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                  • #10
                    Sounds bad. So what do we do about it?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by md21 View Post
                      Sounds bad. So what do we do about it?

                      Get mad at each other on fvsports.com until I eventually convince everyone to see the world my way.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ivegostdacityblues View Post


                        Get mad at each other on fvsports.com until I eventually convince everyone to see the world my way.
                        And call anyone who can't be convinced nasty names and make cock jokes at them.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ibleed View Post

                          And call anyone who can't be convinced nasty names and make cock jokes at them.
                          You're are obviously a racist if he can't convince you.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Triplethreat View Post

                            You're are obviously a racist if he can't convince you.
                            You are a racist for even suggesting that his ideas are misguided. Double super racist if you dare so much as criticize one of those precious POCs.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by md21 View Post
                              Sounds bad. So what do we do about it?
                              My takeaway from this is a little different, I guess. I think what this person is saying has merit, but I think they’re underestimating just how fast the economy is changing. This whole idea that you have to be in a particular place to do a particular thing is quickly becoming outdated. Sure, you’re always going to have a certain percentage of jobs where people have to be physically present with one another, but how high is that percentage really? People are already receiving an increasingly large share of their medical and mental health care from remote sources, and I don’t even need to talk about purchasing consumer goods.

                              Will the American city “die”? Probably not entirely, but I could certainly see them continuing to shrink as a share of the U.S. population and warp into something resembling large scale amusement parks.

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