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Stimulus Pt. 2

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  • Stimulus Pt. 2

    Can someone explain why they don’t just extend the unemployment benefits? Is that somehow more expensive than cutting around round of checks?

  • #2
    Ask Mitch

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Foster4Prez View Post
      Ask Mitch
      I mean, I get the idea of not wanting keep people on unemployment for too long because it disincentivizes working and reduces their chances of going back, I just don’t see how cutting checks is any different.

      Comment


      • #4
        I would assume that they would save money by just giving the unemployed the money and not cutting everyone a check. Businesses are still furloughing people even with PPP, so I don't really know what to do there.

        Comment


        • #5
          Sometimes I really hate being a Democrat. They're going to support a stimulus because it's the right thing to do, even if it gives Trump a big win a few months before Election Day.

          If this were a hypothetical Clinton administration and the GOP held the House, they absolutely would not support a stimulus and use the economic fallout to attack Clinton.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tOSUfanboi2 View Post
            Can someone explain why they don’t just extend the unemployment benefits? Is that somehow more expensive than cutting around round of checks?
            At the heart of this lies the disconnect by Republicans as to exactly how well the economy is doing. They all desperately want the economy to be in a better place than it actually is. They think that extending the UI Benefits will de-incentivize workers from returning to work. At least, that’s the talking point. The underlying idea is that they force people back to work when its becoming increasingly obvious that our last push towards normalcy was premature and clumsily implemented.

            They have yet to come to grips with just how many Americans are struggling, many of whom are their constituents. I’m not sure if many of them care. I’m quite sure McConnell only cares if it affects him personally.

            Another way in which the Republicans in the Senate are being short-sighted is that they’re not looking to the potential devastation to the economy if it is not aided in multiple ways. I’m going to say that, if August 1st rolls around and you have 30,000,000 Americans now unable to work, and now unable to eat or pay their bills or rent? Yeah. You’re going to see the shit hit the proverbial fan.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by DPR View Post
              Sometimes I really hate being a Democrat. They're going to support a stimulus because it's the right thing to do, even if it gives Trump a big win a few months before Election Day.

              If this were a hypothetical Clinton administration and the GOP held the House, they absolutely would not support a stimulus and use the economic fallout to attack Clinton.
              The stimulus check is a band aid. The extension of UI is what might save multiple industries. The problem is that the check is the better PR move for Trump. In truth, people need both.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Deschet View Post

                At the heart of this lies the disconnect by Republicans as to exactly how well the economy is doing. They all desperately want the economy to be in a better place than it actually is. They think that extending the UI Benefits will de-incentivize workers from returning to work. At least, that’s the talking point. The underlying idea is that they force people back to work when its becoming increasingly obvious that our last push towards normalcy was premature and clumsily implemented.

                They have yet to come to grips with just how many Americans are struggling, many of whom are their constituents. I’m not sure if many of them care. I’m quite sure McConnell only cares if it affects him personally.

                Another way in which the Republicans in the Senate are being short-sighted is that they’re not looking to the potential devastation to the economy if it is not aided in multiple ways. I’m going to say that, if August 1st rolls around and you have 30,000,000 Americans now unable to work, and now unable to eat or pay their bills or rent? Yeah. You’re going to see the shit hit the proverbial fan.
                I mean, i think the theory is that if you can keep people afloat....the economy will return to close to where it was in March.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Deschet View Post

                  At the heart of this lies the disconnect by Republicans as to exactly how well the economy is doing. They all desperately want the economy to be in a better place than it actually is. They think that extending the UI Benefits will de-incentivize workers from returning to work. At least, that’s the talking point. The underlying idea is that they force people back to work when its becoming increasingly obvious that our last push towards normalcy was premature and clumsily implemented.

                  They have yet to come to grips with just how many Americans are struggling, many of whom are their constituents. I’m not sure if many of them care. I’m quite sure McConnell only cares if it affects him personally.

                  Another way in which the Republicans in the Senate are being short-sighted is that they’re not looking to the potential devastation to the economy if it is not aided in multiple ways. I’m going to say that, if August 1st rolls around and you have 30,000,000 Americans now unable to work, and now unable to eat or pay their bills or rent? Yeah. You’re going to see the shit hit the proverbial fan.
                  It’s not a talking point really, it’s a pretty well known fact that the longer someone stays out of work, the less likely they are to go back into the workforce. It’s also not a great idea to pay people more than their average salary to not work, which is currently the case for a lot of people.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tOSUfanboi2 View Post

                    It’s not a talking point really, it’s a pretty well known fact that the longer someone stays out of work, the less likely they are to go back into the workforce. It’s also not a great idea to pay people more than their average salary to not work, which is currently the case for a lot of people.
                    Okay. Counterpoint. The UI benefits were designed to keep people home, and to stimulate the economy. I’d argue that it was effective in doing that.

                    I get your point. But, here’s the thing. You’re thinking like a salaried worker. Those people who are in sales, from servers and bartenders right on up to high-end sales jobs aren’t predicated on salaries. That’s a big chunk of the economy, and they’re holding on for dear life.

                    McConnell and his trickle-downers want people back out and dying for the stock market ASAP.

                    I get it. Republicans are fundamentally against government assistance. They didn’t like giving that extra $600 when the pandemic was just getting started and honestly believed that, by August, things were going to turn around. In some ways, things have gotten better. In other ways, they’re getting progressive worse.

                    I’ll say this. This isn’t going to get better any time soon. There’s no perfect solution. Republicans and Democrats alike are going to have to compromise. Because, we’re talking tens of millions of American lives on the line.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Deschet View Post

                      Okay. Counterpoint. The UI benefits were designed to keep people home, and to stimulate the economy. I’d argue that it was effective in doing that.

                      I get your point. But, here’s the thing. You’re thinking like a salaried worker. Those people who are in sales, from servers and bartenders right on up to high-end sales jobs aren’t predicated on salaries. That’s a big chunk of the economy, and they’re holding on for dear life.

                      McConnell and his trickle-downers want people back out and dying for the stock market ASAP.

                      I get it. Republicans are fundamentally against government assistance. They didn’t like giving that extra $600 when the pandemic was just getting started and honestly believed that, by August, things were going to turn around. In some ways, things have gotten better. In other ways, they’re getting progressive worse.

                      I’ll say this. This isn’t going to get better any time soon. There’s no perfect solution. Republicans and Democrats alike are going to have to compromise. Because, we’re talking tens of millions of American lives on the line.
                      I understand and agree with everything you’re saying here, but I do think it’s important to be practical. Trust me, if it was up to me, I’d probably extend unemployment and cut the checks because I think it’s something we can work out later. That said, I don’t think it’s entirely wrong to want one and not the other, because there’s an argument to be made for all sides of this. We don’t want to set the precedent that the government is going to give out free money every time things get bad, and we want to encourage people to work, but we need to recognize how unique this situation is too. We haven’t dealt with a pandemic like this in 100 years, and the economy and resources available to us then vs now are radically different.

                      What bothers me about all of this is that this pandemic is taking place during an election year, which means whatever ends up being done is almost certainly not going to be as good as it could be. Nobody wants to be the one who opposed helping people, didn’t go far enough, or went too far, so everybody is scrambling to try and find the perfect solution. As you said, that solution doesn’t exist so we’re just going to have to wing it and let the chips fall where they may. It sucks, but that’s reality.

                      I also view this as a watershed moment in our history. The American people are once again at a crossroads where we’re going to have to decide between banding together and burning shit down. Thankfully, I truly believe that the vast majority of America is in the former camp, and a lot of what I’ve seen has been very reassuring. It’s easy to forget how things are when the media reports nothing but chaos and destruction 24/7, but most people really are working together and being kind right now in my experience.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tOSUfanboi2 View Post

                        I understand and agree with everything you’re saying here, but I do think it’s important to be practical. Trust me, if it was up to me, I’d probably extend unemployment and cut the checks because I think it’s something we can work out later. That said, I don’t think it’s entirely wrong to want one and not the other, because there’s an argument to be made for all sides of this. We don’t want to set the precedent that the government is going to give out free money every time things get bad, and we want to encourage people to work, but we need to recognize how unique this situation is too. We haven’t dealt with a pandemic like this in 100 years, and the economy and resources available to us then vs now are radically different.

                        What bothers me about all of this is that this pandemic is taking place during an election year, which means whatever ends up being done is almost certainly not going to be as good as it could be. Nobody wants to be the one who opposed helping people, didn’t go far enough, or went too far, so everybody is scrambling to try and find the perfect solution. As you said, that solution doesn’t exist so we’re just going to have to wing it and let the chips fall where they may. It sucks, but that’s reality.

                        I also view this as a watershed moment in our history. The American people are once again at a crossroads where we’re going to have to decide between banding together and burning shit down. Thankfully, I truly believe that the vast majority of America is in the former camp, and a lot of what I’ve seen has been very reassuring. It’s easy to forget how things are when the media reports nothing but chaos and destruction 24/7, but most people really are working together and being kind right now in my experience.
                        We’re not disagreeing on much at all... especially when it comes to being in not just an election year, but an election in which you have Trump — a man which you either love or you loathe — at the epicenter. This makes matters incredibly more difficult.

                        While it’s true that Republicans don’t want to establish precedent in terms of enhancing or extending government assistance, you also have guys like Mnuchin and McConnell, who are far more concerned with just getting people back to work... never mind the consequences. To say that they’re eager to put this whole mess behind them is an understatement. And so, today we have leaks that indicate that extending the UI benefits is off the table.

                        My hope is that this is a litmus test, to gauge its popularity among their electorate. I can tell you that it’s not being received positively by many who are directly affected. Those who are okay with it are more than likely those who can work from home and are making enough money that they’re not affected. Or, so they think.

                        If they don’t extend the UI benefits, I can tell you right now, the service industry is going to collapse. Their collapse will affect other businesses that are dependent on them. Think breweries. Think farms. But, those are just the obvious and immediate casualties.

                        We’re about to throw the economy off a cliff in hopes that desperation outweighs pragmatism. I’ve been talking to bar and restaurant owners all week. Most of their employees will need to start driving Lyft and Über just to make ends meat... many of them planning to continue with their unemployment checks and hoping that things get better, while exposing themselves in close confines, 20 times a day, to people who are likely not tested for the virus.

                        That’s fucking frightening. The reality is that most restaurants here are about to re-close in a week or so. In that time, many workers could find themselves in the worst of all times.

                        If they do nothing to help those who desperately need help, the rioting we’ve seen up until this point will seem like Sesame Street. Imagine if millions of Americans are abandoned because of politics. What do you think is going to happen?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DPR View Post
                          Sometimes I really hate being a Democrat. They're going to support a stimulus because it's the right thing to do, even if it gives Trump a big win a few months before Election Day.

                          If this were a hypothetical Clinton administration and the GOP held the House, they absolutely would not support a stimulus and use the economic fallout to attack Clinton.
                          *prayers sent*

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            So, after a day of Republicans sending up trial balloons and litmus tests, it appears there might be movement on extending the UI benefits. It likely didn’t hurt that most major news organizations basically went on a blitzkrieg reporting on the ramifications of not extending it, effectively placing the GOP under tremendous pressure. Will they blink? I can’t really say. I know it galls them that so many undeserving people can pay bills.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Deschet View Post
                              So, after a day of Republicans sending up trial balloons and litmus tests, it appears there might be movement on extending the UI benefits. It likely didn’t hurt that most major news organizations basically went on a blitzkrieg reporting on the ramifications of not extending it, effectively placing the GOP under tremendous pressure. Will they blink? I can’t really say. I know it galls them that so many undeserving people can pay bills.
                              Thankfully, they don’t have a choice in an election year. They’re going to extend it.

                              Comment

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