Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Are Millennials this Brain Dead?

Collapse

Google Ads

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Are Millennials this Brain Dead?

    You know what we used to call people like this? Losers/ outlasts, etc... But this appears to be the average everyday Democrat young voter.

    I weep for the future

    http://twitchy.com/2015/11/09/millen...mpaign=twitter
    Last edited by PBS; 11-09-2015, 10:18 PM.

  • #2
    Were they all millennials?

    Comment


    • #3
      Well the adults likely had the brain function of an adolescent so pretty much.

      Comment


      • #4
        Glad to know someone's out there fighting for the third amendment.

        Comment


        • #5
          .

          Comment


          • #6
            Dear shitheads, please refrain from blocking traffic. Otherwise Mommy and Daddy's money will need to be used to get you out of jail.

            Comment


            • #7
              *posts gross generalization about another generation*

              Comment


              • #8
                Those god damn outlasts...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Debit Cash View Post
                  You know what we used to call people like this? Losers/ outlasts, etc... But this appears to be the average everyday Democrat young voter.

                  I weep for the future

                  http://twitchy.com/2015/11/09/millen...mpaign=twitter
                  I'm a Millennial. I have never blocked traffic.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Read the signs: "Our Generation- Our Choice!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      These pampered kids are in for a rude awakening when they enter the real world.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Ha. I live a few blocks from here and ran by this. What an overblown story. The street they were blocking (H St) is barely a street in front of Lafayette Sq and is used primarily by WH and VA staff. I saw a few hanging around on the intersection of Mass and 12th, but I don't think they were there for long.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A couple of questions:

                          1. are HS/college aged kids still considered millennials? I figured I was at the tail end, but maybe the term has expanded. I ask because most of those people look like they're between 16-20.
                          2. Holy hipster clothes, batman. Maybe I don't pay enough attention but I feel like there isn't much hipster dress in DC compared to other cities (thankfully).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by biasedHAMILTON View Post
                            A couple of questions:

                            1. are HS/college aged kids still considered millennials? I figured I was at the tail end, but maybe the term has expanded. I ask because most of those people look like they're between 16-20.

                            Yes. Most definitions put a generation at around 20 years (more or less), and there is some bleed between them. One definition I saw shows a range between 1982 and 2004. Personally, I think the reliance on named generations to categorize people based on when they are born is not really that useful. To me, it's more free flowing than that.

                            For one, using this generation as an example, to include people born in 1982 and people born in 2004 is pretty much asinine IMO. Discounting the age difference (a 33 year old and an 11 year old), the range itself is very flawed because certain world events had a huge impact on how people of this generation developed. Early Millennials can obviously remember the 80s, which is starkly different now. Early Millennials grew up in a different technological age, and can remember when vinyl albums were just as common as CDs, computers had black screens and text, cell phones were a rare device, coin operated phone booths existed, things like touch screen and voice activated technology were futuristic (not commonplace). There were also a number of big world events that took place that had an impact on how we view the world. Young Millennials can't remember the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Gulf War, genocide in Somalia and Kosovo, the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal, or perhaps most importantly, pre-and post 911. You could make the same argument for other generations....but it seems that there are some major differences between each class of high schoolers every 4-5 years.

                            To give you some family examples:
                            My brother is 34...born in 1981. He's not a Millennial. I am 30....born in 1985. I am. While we have some differences as far as how we grew up, we are a lot closer in terms of generation than him and his oldest daughter, who was born in 2004. Technically me and niece share the same generation, but we will likely share little in common as the next generation rises and they look at Millennials the same way we do at Gen-X.

                            My brother doesn't really identify with Gen-X, either, since he's at the tail end of that generation. We share more in common with one another than we do the generations we are attached to. I can identify more with younger members of Gen-X (say, under 40) than I can with people that are less than 10 years younger than me.

                            Another major difference would be our parents, who were born in 1950. They were in their 30s when they had us, while a lot of our peers's parents were a little younger. So we had Baby Boomer parents when a lot of other people had Gen-X parents. That makes a big difference as well. Our parents had a much different outlook than those born in the 60s. Our parents were in college during the height of the Vietnam War and the hippie movement. Most of our friend's parents came of age after that time...so there were some pretty stark differences in how we were raised compared to how our friends were raised.


                            Why are we so reliant on generations to describe groups of people?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Nash View Post


                              Yes. Most definitions put a generation at around 20 years (more or less), and there is some bleed between them. One definition I saw shows a range between 1982 and 2004. Personally, I think the reliance on named generations to categorize people based on when they are born is not really that useful. To me, it's more free flowing than that.

                              For one, using this generation as an example, to include people born in 1982 and people born in 2004 is pretty much asinine IMO. Discounting the age difference (a 33 year old and an 11 year old), the range itself is very flawed because certain world events had a huge impact on how people of this generation developed. Early Millennials can obviously remember the 80s, which is starkly different now. Early Millennials grew up in a different technological age, and can remember when vinyl albums were just as common as CDs, computers had black screens and text, cell phones were a rare device, coin operated phone booths existed, things like touch screen and voice activated technology were futuristic (not commonplace). There were also a number of big world events that took place that had an impact on how we view the world. Young Millennials can't remember the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Gulf War, genocide in Somalia and Kosovo, the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal, or perhaps most importantly, pre-and post 911. You could make the same argument for other generations....but it seems that there are some major differences between each class of high schoolers every 4-5 years.

                              To give you some family examples:
                              My brother is 34...born in 1981. He's not a Millennial. I am 30....born in 1985. I am. While we have some differences as far as how we grew up, we are a lot closer in terms of generation than him and his oldest daughter, who was born in 2004. Technically me and niece share the same generation, but we will likely share little in common as the next generation rises and they look at Millennials the same way we do at Gen-X.

                              My brother doesn't really identify with Gen-X, either, since he's at the tail end of that generation. We share more in common with one another than we do the generations we are attached to. I can identify more with younger members of Gen-X (say, under 40) than I can with people that are less than 10 years younger than me.

                              Another major difference would be our parents, who were born in 1950. They were in their 30s when they had us, while a lot of our peers's parents were a little younger. So we had Baby Boomer parents when a lot of other people had Gen-X parents. That makes a big difference as well. Our parents had a much different outlook than those born in the 60s. Our parents were in college during the height of the Vietnam War and the hippie movement. Most of our friend's parents came of age after that time...so there were some pretty stark differences in how we were raised compared to how our friends were raised.


                              Why are we so reliant on generations to describe groups of people?
                              More good points than a Baylor offense.

                              The bolded: because in-group out-group bias is a powerful evolutionary/social mechanism.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X